American College of Cardiology, March 28-30

The American College of Cardiology 69th Annual Scientific Session and Expo The annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology was held virtually from March 28 to 30 and attracted […]

The American College of Cardiology 69th Annual Scientific Session and Expo

The annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology was held virtually from March 28 to 30 and attracted participants from around the world, including clinicians, academicians, allied health professionals, and others interested in cardiology. The conference highlighted recent advances in the treatment, management, and prevention of cardiovascular diseases, with presentations focusing on novel drugs and surgical approaches to improve the quality of care for patients with cardiovascular diseases.

In one study, Ramin Ebrahimi, M.D., of the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, and colleagues found that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common disorder in female veterans as well as an independent predictor of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in this population.

“PTSD was very prevalent in our women veterans. Over 18 percent of the women veterans had PTSD. It is also significantly associated with IHD: 20 percent increased odds ratio of IHD in patients with PTSD as opposed to those without PTSD,” Ebrahimi said. “After doing serial adjustments for (1) age; (2) traditional IHD risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and smoking); (3) obesity and chronic kidney disease; (4) female-specific risk factors such as gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension, and placental disorders; and (5) psychiatric and neuroendocrine disorders as well as alcohol and illicit drug use, the positive association between PTSD and IHD remained elevated and highly significant, with a P value of less than 0.0001. Our results may have clinical implications for earlier and more routine IHD screening in women veterans with PTSD and potentially women in general.”

Press Release

In the VOYAGER PAD study, William R. Hiatt, M.D., of the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver, and colleagues found that among patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease undergoing lower-extremity revascularization, a combination of rivaroxaban plus aspirin is effective at preventing acute limb ischemia, major amputation of vascular cause, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and cardiovascular death. Adding clopidogrel does not alter the benefit of rivaroxaban-aspirin; however, it does increase bleeding risk during the time of clopidogrel exposure.

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